Category Archives: Art & Culture

GLORIA MBA TALKS ABOUT HER ACTING CAREER

Gloria Mba is a very popular face on most television sets in Nigeria and she happens to be one of Nigeria’s fantastic actresses. St. Hilary’s Magazine had an interview with her. Jereaghogho Efeturi Ukusare brings you all the details of the interview. 



SHM: How did you get into acting?
Mba: I got into the movie industry through an aunt of mine who saw the potential in me and told my parents to allow me. Although, my dad was against it for a while but later allowed me seeing that it was something I really wanted to do. I had already spent two years in the industry already.

SHM: Can you tell me about your debut production as an actress?

Mba: My first job was with Lancelot Imasuen. I came in as a novice and had so many things in my head on how to become a very good actress. It was after that I told myself that I am now in the industry.

SHM: You seem to be more in soaps, is it that you prefer TV to film.

Mba: (Laughs) why do you press guys feel that way? Anyways, I don’t prefer soaps to movies. As at the time I started series, I had acted in a lot of films and these films were between 2003 and 2005. Series is something you always see on your local TV stations unlike movies. So, the answer is no, I don’t prefer them. I am more into movies than series.

SHM: Your role Model

Mba: My parents and my senior friends are my role models and this is because they have over time shown me what it really takes to be in this industry and to persevere. However, in my line of work I see a lot of senior colleagues as role models who are digging deep in the industry.

SHM: What soaps have you acted in?

Mba: (Smiles) they are so many. From where do you want me to start counting? Okay, Superstory (Secret), Tales of Eve, US, Behind The Siege, Radiance, This thing Called Marriage 2, Family Puzzle, Hills and Valley, Footprints… and these are the ones I can remember right now.

SHM: Tell us about the ones you actually love

Mba: I can’t say because all the roles I have played are beautiful characters so I can’t say which one I love more than the other. Don’t forget I don’t play me, I play the characters in the scripts and all of them are good.



SHM: Your debut movie. Can you tell us about it vis a vis your role in it?

Mba: Nothing much to tell because the character I played wasn’t a major character. It was just an applicant for the post of an office assistant that must be slept with before she gets the job. That was it.

SHM: How many movies have you been involved in?

Mba: Hmm! I have done many movies. I have done over 40 movies, can’t start counting.

SHM: What challenges have you had in your career?

Mba: (Takes a deep breathe) Many! I have had many and in different ways. Not having jobs regularly, the pay not being competitive and so on. But over time I came to understand the job. When it comes, sometimes you have about five to six jobs at once. Then, you stay for may be another two months. But in all, it has been good. This has made me to read more and learn more about the industry I am.

SHM: In your journey as an actress, what point will you consider the best and what point will you consider the worst?

Mba: The best is when you’re working and it’s yielding results and the low parts is when you’re working and piracy is frustrating your efforts. But in all, the high points always supersede the low points.

SHM: What has kept you going?

Mba: God has kept me going. The love for what I do, family, friends and my fans (blows a kiss).

SHM: You are involved in a number of series currently running on TV. Kindly tell us about the character you play in them.

Mba: Okay, there’s Liberty Villa on STV where I play Patige. Patige is a working class mom that her husband supports. She is going through gender related issues at her place of work but she does not succumb. There’s FESTAC Town on Iroko TV. Where I play the role of the wife of Kunle Coker. She supports her wayward son and this is not going down well with her husband and there’s also Superstory which airs on AIT. I play the role of Efe, a young lady married to a man that won’t say no to and runs after anything in skirt. She’s not ready to give him a breathing space even after having kids and many years in marriage until someone dies in his care and she holds the secret over his head until the end.

SHM: What is your advice for upcoming actors and actresses?

Mba: Hmm! Be ready for disappointment, harassment and the joy that comes with it. If you are ready for the job and you love it, you won’t want to quit because a time will come you will want to quit. Above all, put God first, persevere, work on yourself and be confident. As an actor or actress, you need these to be successful and then, the sky will be your starting point.


SHM: You have lots of fans out there, some look up to you, some just love to see you do your thing. What do you have to say to them?

Mba: I love you all. God bless you all for me because without you, who would I be? In all, I want to say thank you to God Almighty, and the real MVP (family, friends and fans) supporting me as Gloria Mba. (Blows Kisses)

End.

 

 

 

 

 

 

MY DAD IS MY ROLE MODEL – GRACE EDWIN OKON

St. Hilary’s Magazine recently caught up with ace movie producer Grace Edwin Okon and had a chat with her. Below are the details of the chat between her and St Hilary’s Jereaghogho Efeturi Ukusare. 

SHM: When did you start your journey in the movies industry? 

Edwin Okon: I started in 1998.

SHM: Can you tell me about your debut production as an actress? 

Edwin Okon: It was in a movie titled Tears in Heaven. I played the role of Kome. It was directed and produced by Zeb Ejiro

SHM: What inspired you to seek a career in the movies industry?

Edwin Okon: It wasn’t exactly planned, I was with a friend who went for a casting call for Tears in Heaven…And Uncle asked me to help read some lines to help my friend Tina do her audition..he liked the way I read and gave me the role..after that I didn’t look bad, I have been in the industry since then.

SHM: Who was your role model and what do you like about him?

Edwin Okon: My dad is my role model. What I like about him is the fact that he is a goal getter.

SHM: What movies have you acted in? 

Edwin Okon:  Tears in Heaven, Heavy Beauty, My dream, Prodigal brother, Karma is a Bae and Doctor’s Quaters (series) Candle light (Series)

SHM: Could you give a synopsis of the one you liked best?

Edwin Okon: Tears in Heaven because it was my first and it had a lovely story line about 4 orphans who fought their way to success in their singing career.

SHM: At what point did you decide to go into producing your own Movies and why?

Edwin Okon: In 2004, when I was getting inspiration to tell my own stories. I didn’t shoot my film though until 2012 but I was working on other types of TV content between 2004 and 2012.

How many movies have you produced thus far?

Edwin Okon: I have produced 21 movies.

SHM: Tell us about them

Edwin Okon: My films are mostly films that have social messages and impact society positively.

SHM: Which was most challenging?

Edwin Okon: It was Heavy Beauty as it was my first movie.

SHM: In your career so far, what has been the highest point and lowest point?

Edwin Okon: Highest point has been each time a film I work on receives an award as well as when I won producer of the year. No lowest point so far I just have challenges which i do my best to overcome.

SHM: Any regrets?

Edwin Okon: None so far.

SHM: Heavy Beauty! What was the inspiration? I mean details like never before.

Edwin Okon: I had a dream on the story and started working on it soon as I woke up. The dream was like I was watching a movie. So, I knew I just had to make the film.

SHM: What is your advice for upcoming actors and actresses?

Edwin Okon: Don’t be too desperate; rather, be determined and focus on your dream and someday, it will come to pass.

SHM: And, your advice for aspiring movie producers?

Edwin Okon: Never give up on your dreams. Keep trying until you succeed.

SMH: What are we to expect from you in the near future?

Edwin Okon: (smiling) May be a TV station.

SHM: Okay! Thank you very much, we would watch out for that. 

Edwin Okon: Thank you!

 

 

 

 

 

 

2018 HEADIES AWARDS AND WINNERS

Full list of categories and winners below:

BEST RECORDING OF THE YEAR

BUTTERFLIES – OMAWUMI

HALLELUYAH – FUNBI

PONMILE – REMINISCE

HEAVEN – BANKY W

JOROMI – SIMI (WINNER)

BEST POP SINGLE

MAD OVER YOU – RUNTOWN

ALL OVER – TIWA SAVAGE

YEBA – KISS DANIEL

ISKABA – WANDE COAL AND DJ TUNEZ

IF– DAVIDO (WINNER)

FIA – DAVIDO

PRODUCER OF THE YEAR

(FALL, MAMA) KIDOMINANT (WINNER)

(ISKABA, MALO) SPELLZ

(IF, RARA) TEKNO

(MARADONA, COME CLOSER) SARZ

(YAWA, VIRTUOUS WOMAN)– MASTERKRAFT

BEST REGGAE/DANCEHALL SINGLE

LOVE YOU DIE – PATORANKING FT. DIAMOND PLATNUMZ

DANCE – TIMAYA FT. RUDEBOY

HOLY HOLY – 2BABA (WINNER)

ROCK YOUR BODY – BURNA BOY

COME CLOSER – WIZKID

SOFA – KISS DANIEL

BEST RAP ALBUM

27 – FALZ

TRIP TO THE SOUTH – ERIGGA

EL HADJ – REMINISCE (WINNER)

THE PLAYMAKER – PHYNO

THE GLORY – OLAMIDE

ROSE – AQ

BEST R&B/POP ALBUM

SOUNDS FROM THE OTHER SIDE – WIZKID(WINNER)

TIMELESS – OMAWUMI

SIMISOLA – SIMI

GOLD – ADEKUNLE GOLD

IJELE THE TRAVELLER – FLAVOR

THIS IS ME – NINIOLA

BEST MUSIC VIDEO

MA LO – TIWA SAVAGE FT WIZKID (MEJI ALABI)

FOCUS– HUMBLE SMITH (CLARENCE PETERS)

COME CLOSER – WIZKID (DAPS) [WINNER]

BEEN CALLING – MALEEK BERRY (MEJI ALABI)

YOLO – SEYI SHAY (MEJI ALABI)

LIKE DAT – DAVIDO (DAPS)

BEST R&B SINGLE

TONIGHT – NONSO AMADI

FOLASHADE – PRAIZ

LET ME KNOW – MALEEK BERRY

ROMEO & JULIET – JOHHNY DRILLE

LOVE YOU BABY – BANKY W

SMILE FOR ME – SIMI (WINNER)

BEST COLLABO

MA LO – TIWA SAVAGE FT WIZKID (WINNER)

TEMPER REMIX – SKALES FT BURNA BOY

JUICE – YCEE FT MALEEK BERRY

NO FORGET – ADEKUNLE GOLD FT. SIMI

COME CLOSER – WIZKID FT. DRAKE

BEST RAP SINGLE

YOU RAPPERS SHOULD FIX UP YOUR LIVES – MI (WINNER)

SOMETHING LITE – FALZ FT YCEE

LINK UP – PHYNO FT. BURNA BOY, M.I.

UP TO YOU – SHOW DEM CAMP FT FUNBI

ME VERSUS ME – ICE PRINCE

BEST VOCAL PERFORMANCE(MALE)

A NON-VOTING CATEGORY:

PERFECT WOMAN – FAZE

FOLASHADE – PRAIZ (WINNER)

ROMEO & JULIET – JOHNNY DRILLE

TONIGHT – NONSO AMADI

LOVE YOU BABY – BANKY W

BEST VOCAL PERFORMANCE (FEMALE)

A NON-VOTING CATEGORY:

IN THE AIR – WAJE

GONE FOR GOOD – SIMI

JOWO – ARAMIDE

SARO – NINIOLA

WHERE’S THE LOVE – NIYOLA FT. ADEKUNLE GOLD

BUTTERFLIES – OMAWUMI (WINNER)

NEXT RATED

MALEEK BERRY

MAYORKUN (WINNER)

DICE AILES

JOHNNY DRILLE

ZORO

HIP HOP WORLD REVELATION

NINIOLA

ADEKUNLE GOLD

MR. EAZI

REEKADO BANKS (WINNER)

LYRICIST ON THE ROLL

YOU RAPPERS SHOULD FIX UP YOUR LIVES – MI (WINNER)

POLITICAL SCIENCE – AQ

LIQUOR NIGHT – BOOGEY

INDUSTRY NITE – ERIGGA

BEST STREET-HOP ARTISTE

PENALTY – SMALL DOCTOR (WINNER)

WO – OLAMIDE

SAI BABA – CDQ

SHEPETERI – IDOWEST FT. DAMMY KRANE, SLIM CASE

PASS THE AGBARA – SKUKI

LEGBEGBE – MR REAL FT. IDOWEST, KELVIN CHUKS, OBADICE

BEST ‘ALTERNATIVE’ SONG

MONEY – ADEKUNLE GOLD

RADIO – NONSO AMADI

ROMEO & JULIET – JOHNNY DRILLE

PONMILE – REMINISCE

FUN MI LOWO MI – ARAMIDE FT. SOUND SULTAN & KOKER (WINNER)

LAGOS BARBIE – BANTU

ALBUM OF THE YEAR

SIMISOLA – SIMI (WINNER)

GOLD – ADEKUNLE GOLD

KLITORIS – BRYMO

IJELE THE TRAVELER – FLAVOUR

SOUNDS FROM THE OTHER SIDE – WIZKID

THE PLAYMAKER – PHYNO

ARTISTE OF THE YEAR

DAVIDO (WINNER)

WIZKID

OLAMIDE

SIMI

TIWA SAVAGE

SONG OF THE YEAR

PENALTY – SMALL DOCTOR

WO – OLAMIDE

IF– DAVIDO (Winner)

YEBA – KISS DANIEL

MAD OVER YOU – RUNTOWN

FIA – DAVIDO

AFRICAN ARTISTE

SARKODIE

CASPER NYOVEST

NASTY C (WINNER)

SAUTI SOL

VANESSA MDEE

HEADIES’ VIEWER’S CHOICE

COME CLOSER– WIZKID (WINNER)

IF– DAVIDO

WO -OLAMIDE

MAD OVER YOU – RUNTOWN

YEBA– KISS DANIEL

YAWA -TEKNO

BEST PERFORMER

FLAVOUR

FALZ

M.I.

2BABA

YEMI ALADE (WINNER)

TIWA SAVAGE

ROOKIE OF THE YEAR

KIDI

AIR BOY

TENI (WINNER)

JUNIOR BOY

PERUZZI

SPECIAL RECOGNITION

KAFFY- (Winner)

HALL OF FAME

CHRIS UBOSI

The 2018 Headies Awards held on Saturday night at the Convention Centre, Eko Hotels and Suites, Lagos. It was the 12th edition of the annual event.

Davido led with four awards, including Artist of the year and Song of the year. Wizkid had three awards while Simi won the Album of the year.

TRIBUTE TO HUGH RAMAPOLO MASEKELA

 

Masekela1

Hugh Ramapolo Masekela was born in Kwaguqa, Witbank, South Africa to Thomas Selena Masekela, who was a health inspector and sculptor and his wife, Pauline Bowers Masekela, a social worker on the 4th of  April 1939. he began singing and playing piano and was largely raised by his grandmother, who ran an illegal bar for miners. At the age of 14, after seeing the film Young Man with a Horn (in which Kirk Douglas plays a character modelled on American jazz cornetist Bix Beiderbecke), Masekela took up playing the trumpet. His first trumpet, from Louis Armstrong, was given to him by Archbishop Trevor Huddleston, the anti-apartheid chaplain at St. Peter’s Secondary School now known as St. Martin’s School (Rosettenville).

From 1954, Masekela played music that closely reflected his life experience. The agony, conflict, and exploitation South Africa faced during the 1950s and 1960s inspired and influenced him to make music and also spread political change. He was an artist who in his music vividly portrayed the struggles and sorrows, as well as the joys and passions of his country. His music protested about apartheid, slavery, government; the hardships individuals were living. Masekela reached a large population that also felt oppressed due to the country’s situation.

Following a Manhattan Brothers tour of South Africa in 1958, Masekela wound up in the orchestra of the musical King Kong, written by Todd Matshikiza. King Kong was South Africa’s first blockbuster theatrical success, touring the country for a sold-out year with Miriam Makeba and the Manhattan Brothers’ Nathan Mdledle in the lead. The musical later went to London’s West End for two years.

Hugh Masekela

He had hits in the United States with the pop jazz tunes “Up, Up and Away” (1967) and the number-one smash “Grazing in the Grass” (1968), which sold four million copies. He also appeared at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967, and was subsequently featured in the film Monterey Pop by D. A. Pennebaker. In 1974, Masekela and friend Stewart Levine organised the Zaire 74 music festival in Kinshasa set around the Rumble in the Jungle boxing match.

He played primarily in jazz ensembles, with guest appearances on recordings by The Byrds (“So You Want to Be a Rock ‘n’ Roll Star” and “Lady Friend”) and Paul Simon (“Further to Fly”). In 1984, Masekela released the album Techno Bush; from that album, a single entitled “Don’t Go Lose It Baby” peaked at number two for two weeks on the dance charts. In 1987, he had a hit single with “Bring Him Back Home”. The song became enormously popular, and turned into an unofficial anthem of the anti-apartheid movement and an anthem for the movement to free Nelson Mandela.

A renewed interest in his African roots led Masekela to collaborate with West and Central African musicians, and finally to reconnect with Southern African players when he set up with the help of Jive Records a mobile studio in Botswana, just over the South African border, from 1980 to 1984. Here he re-absorbed and re-used mbaqanga strains, a style he continued to use following his return to South Africa in the early 1990s.

In 1985 Masekela founded the Botswana International School of Music (BISM), which held its first workshop in Gaborone in that year. The event, still in existence, continues as the annual Botswana Music Camp, giving local musicians of all ages and from all backgrounds the opportunity to play and perform together. Masekela taught the jazz course at the first workshop, and performed at the final concert.

Also in the 1980s, Masekela toured with Paul Simon in support of Simon’s album Graceland, which featured other South African artists such as Ladysmith Black Mambazo, Miriam Makeba, Ray Phiri, and other elements of the band Kalahari, with which Masekela recorded in the 1980s. He also collaborated in the musical development for the Broadway play, Sarafina! and recorded with the band Kalahari.

Masekela3

In 2003, he was featured in the documentary film Amandla!: A Revolution in Four-Part Harmony. In 2004, he released his autobiography, Still Grazing: The Musical Journey of Hugh Masekela, co-authored with journalist D. Michael Cheers, which detailed Masekela’s struggles against apartheid in his homeland, as well as his personal struggles with alcoholism from the late 1970s through to the 1990s. In this period, he migrated, in his personal recording career, to mbaqanga, jazz/funk, and the blending of South African sounds, through two albums he recorded with Herb Alpert, and solo recordings, Techno-Bush (recorded in his studio in Botswana), Tomorrow (featuring the anthem “Bring Him Back Home”), Uptownship (a lush-sounding ode to American R&B), Beatin’ Aroun de BushSixtyTime, and Revival. His song “Soweto Blues”, sung by his former wife, Miriam Makeba, is a blues/jazz piece that mourns the carnage of the Soweto riots in 1976. He also provided interpretations of songs composed by Jorge Ben, Antônio Carlos Jobim, Caiphus Semenya, Jonas Gwangwa, Dorothy Masuka and Fela Kuti.

In 2006 Masekela was described by Michael A. Gomez, professor of history and Middle Eastern and Islamic studies at New York University as “the father of South African jazz.” In 2009, Masekela released the album Phola (meaning “to get well, to heal”), his second recording for 4 Quarters Entertainment/Times Square Records. It includes some songs he wrote in the 1980s but never completed, as well as a reinterpretation of “The Joke of Life (Brinca de Vivre)”, which he recorded in the mid-1980s. From October 2007, he was a board member of the Woyome Foundation for Africa. 

In 2010, Masekela was featured, with his son Selema Masekela, in a series of videos on ESPN. The series, called Umlando – Through My Father’s Eyes, was aired in 10 parts during ESPN’s coverage of the FIFA World Cup in South Africa. The series focused on Hugh’s and Selema’s travels through South Africa. Hugh brought his son to the places he grew up. It was Selema’s first trip to his father’s homeland.

On 3 December 2013, Masekela guested with the Dave Matthews Band in Johannesburg, South Africa. He joined Rashawn Ross on trumpet for “Proudest Monkey” and “Grazing in the Grass”.

In 2016, at Emperors Palace, Johannesburg, Masekela and Abdullah Ibrahim performed together for the first time in 60 years, reuniting the Jazz Epistles in commemoration of the 40th anniversary of the historic 16 June 1976 youth demonstrations. He died on the 23 January 2018.

OGHENEKOME TO PREMIERE ON AFRICA MAGIC SHOWCASE

Effective March 5th 2018, “OGHENEKOME” premieres on Africa Magic Showcase From Mondays To Fridays At 6 pm Nigerian Time.
OGHENEKOME is An Action Drama That Tells The Story Of Politics Of Oil In The Creeks Of The Niger Delta. It Is Full Of Intrigue, Suspense, Power Play, Militancy And Betrayal.

OGHENEKOME stars Ramsey Noah, Segun Arinze, Rachel Oniga, Big Tony, Chelsea Eze, Sam Uche Anyamele, Steph Nora Okere, Frackinscence Eche-Ben, Jerhiton Okpan, Tony Akposheri. 

OGHENEKOME is a Micromedia Production, Directed by Imoh Umoren.

THE NAMIBIAN TRIBE WHERE SEX IS OFFERED TO GUESTS

The people of Ovahimba and Ovazimba tribes in the Kunene and Omusati regions in Northern Namibia have an upheld culture that has defied western influence and agitation.

With a population of over 50,000, the women engage in the daily activity of milking their cows, taking care of the children and other extensive duties while the men go hunting leaving, sometimes, for an extended period of time. These nomads ’ wealth is determined by the number of cattle one has. A polygamous people, the Himba girls are married off to male partners selected by their fathers once they attain puberty.
You cannot ignore the red skin they have. The red colour seen on their skin is called, the otjize paste ( a combination of butterfat , omuzumba scrub and ochre) and its function is to protect their skin from the sun and insect bites . They are also guided by the belief that the colour red signifies “Earth and blood”. Rather than take their baths , the women take a smoke bath and apply aromatic resins on their skin.

Give honour to whom it is due: This saying is applied differently in this tribe. When a visitor comes knocking, a man shows his approval and pleasure of seeing his guest by giving him the Okujepisa Omukazendu treatment . This practice literally means that his wife is given his guest to spend the night while the husband sleeps in another room . In a case where there is no available room, her husband will sleep outside.

This handed down tradition has its “benefits ” in the community : it reduces jealousy and fosters relationships. The woman has little or no opinion in the decision making. Submission to her husband’ s demands comes first. She has an option of refusing to sleep with him but has to sleep in the same room as the guest.

She is also entitled to give her friends to her husband when they visit but this rarely happens .

  – Njideka Agbo